Category Archives: Exhibitions: Current & Forthcoming

This January 75 on Josh

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!! Time to pause for a while and thank everyone for being a wonderful part of 2017.  We appreciate all the love, support and hard work that we’ve received from our subscribers, well-wishers, partners and yes – our wonderful NGZ team.

2017 has been a wonderful year for all of us at the Gallery, now as we start on another calendar,   on behalf of my entire team, I would like to take this opportunity to thank you all for your love and support you’ve showered upon us. It has been a wonderful journey where we met new people, received new ideas and served more people adding up to the memories of 2017.

As we start a new creative year, wish you all the best Compliments of the Season and a very fruitful, happy and prosperous New Year 2018!

Lets, again create wonders for this year! Cheers!

Voti Thebe

Some activities you can look forward to this January,

Bulawayo Conversations: Title: TARMARC HEAT

 

Introducing Tamu Nkiwane, born 1990, lives and works in London, United Kingdom. Tamu is a visiting research resident artist who will be conducting his research from the gallery studios until end of February. Tamu is interested in the topography of London heritage, identity and immateriality institutions. He positions himself into a socio-political awareness within these systems in order to create conversations that defect against their history’s.  he does not believe in the hierarchical approach of materials (or insist on ignoring them) but works within the context of the found, each inquiry is a phase of a larger conceptual idea. For more about Tamu please join us for a Bulawayo Conversations on Friday 19 January 2018 at 4 pm at the John Knight Cinema room.

 

Exhibition: SOUNDS OF HOPE

On Thursday 25 January at 5:30 pm we will open our first exhibition this year, titled Sounds of Hope by a young and enthusiastic painter and performer, Tichaona Mudhobhi. Tich will present a solo exhibition of paintings in the small galleries on Main and we are so excited to see our young artists taking the gallery spaces to shine.  For your invites to these fantastic events please contact the Curatorial department on  00263970721 or email c.zulu@nationalgallery.co.zw or sabona@mweb.co.zw, let’s keep in touch on social media, like our Facebook page National Gallery in Bulawayo follow us on Twitter @BYOgallery.

 

 

 

 

 

BUYA Bulawayo Young Artists exhibition 2017

We would like to take this time a update you on the new exhibition we are showing in the small galleries on Takawira featuring the work by four young artists. Please accept the invitation to the Opening reception to be held on Tuesday 31 October 2017 at 1730hrs

The topic of cultural identity in the visual arts has dominated our creatives spaces and news feeds now more than ever before. The National Gallery of Zimbabwe in Bulawayo and the Intwasa Arts Festival ko Bulawayo has taken the opportunity to address this timely issue from the sensitive perspective of the young artists affected.

“Bulawayo Young Artists BUYA” is a 4 men exhibition highlighting the stories of emerging artists practising in these challenging times the country is currently facing, the artwork ranges from intensely personal to searing the socio-political commentary, the four artists are part of a project called Rent and Easel under the Resident Artists Development Project, identified by the Curator while studying at Mzilikazi Art Centre in 2016, the artists have been resident at the gallery since January 2017 and immediately went on to a mentoring process. Omega and Lawrence Ndlovu were mentored by Printmaker Dumisani Ndlovu, Ndimenhle was mentored by Nonhlanhla Mathe while Lattymore was mentored by George Masaria. Generally, the young artists were free to interact with any of the practising artist’s resident and non-resident artists. Most of the stories being expressed by the artwork exhibited are questioning the notion of who has the right to determine where one is allowed to live and prosper.

 

In a more direct form of condemnation, Omega Masuku’s technique to experiment with batik making technique on paper, a reflection of dissatisfaction with the state of the economy that has affected the opportunities for art development compared to her mentors whom she draws inspiration from artists Nonhlanhla Mathe and Dumisani Ndlovu.
Lawrence and Lattymore present unique creations inspired by collage crafted from found objects and acrylics found in negative spaces. The results are an ongoing experiment with material that pops from anywhere.
Ndimenhle created an artwork titled “Keep Walking,” which uses tight close-ups of the eyes and mouths of young women and mothers who have left their children behind in order to make better lives for them all.

IMG: L to R Ndimenhle, Lattymore, Omega and Lawrence

These young people describe their experiences at the gallery with mentors as a lifeline thrown to them, the pressure on what they do after this exhibition is being felt by both the curator and the artists. The National Gallery and Intwasa Arts Festival will continue to present opportunities for their work to develop. Ultimately the young artists will have to find a working formula and make it work as individuals.
Their statements are short as their careers however their determination in the face of utter despair are great and full of hope. Intwasa Arts Festival ko Bulawayo and the National Gallery in Bulawayo is doing a remarkable job in art development through the resident Artists’ Development Project placing art and artists in strategic spaces for growth that humanises a very polarising space.

BUYA by Four Young Artists @ Intwasa Arts Festival Ko Bulawayo this September.

You too can partner and support the young artists, this exhibition is made possible with the support from the National Gallery of Zimbabwe in Bulawayo

Zimbabwe Annual Independence Exhibition 2017: Cherishing our national pride through art.

We are happy to present the 3rd  Zimbabwe Annual Independence exhibition in collaboration with the Leaders for Africa Network . The exhibition preview will be held on Thursday 27 April 2017, staring at 1730hrs. Honorable Makhosini Hlongwange (MP). Minister of Sport and Recreation.

In 37 years of Zimbabwe’s independence, the National Gallery in Bulawayo continues to join the nation in celebrating the annual event that ushered freedom to the people of Zimbabwe, through an exhibition titled Cherishing National Pride through Arts. Through the exhibition, we are engaging the nation to remember the struggle to freedom and revive the spirit of Ubuntu/uhnu, by celebrating our cultural diversity and shared history, further enriching the nation’s cultural heritage and tangible visual culture. The exhibition is making statements concerning our social developments, environmental surroundings and cultural inheritance.” Largely responding to the question; what does the Zimbabwe independence mean to a Zimbabwean artist to day?

The definition of the word independence in this context implies a tradition, inheritance, legacy, culture and customs or one’s visual perspective of Zimbabwe’s independence the show will aim to be a contemporary guide for creative modernisation and growth driving to preserve cultural archives of the country’s inventive activities in the post-independence Zimbabwe, over the passage of time. The exhibition features the work by 5 Artists Antony Ziyange Mgcini Nyoni, Enock Chimbetete, Tinashe Charleson and Talent Kapadza. the exhibition is Curated by Tafadzwa Gwetai and Cliford Zulu,

The exhibition is being held at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe in Bulawayo, one of the largest and most beautiful spaces for contemporary art in the country from 27 April to 11 June 2017.

Profile Pic- Alter Ego Exhibition

We are please to present the final collaboration projects at the National gallery for 2016 with the House of Menka. The 10 men show curated by Tafadzwa Gwetai will preview on Thursday 1 December 2016, Veteran Painter and sculptor Mr Rashi Jogee will give opening remarks.

house-of-menka

We are happy collaborate with independent curators as we take curatorial practice in Bulawayo to another level by opening our exhibition spaces to present collaborations through workshops and exhibitions.   The exhibition is titled, Profile pic a very popular phenomena in this contemporary digital social media era. A profile picture is the image that represents a social media account in all its interactions across a platform. An ‘alter ego’ (another persona) is thus created and through peoples ability to edit and alter their images to recreate and re invent themselves and present themselves to the world.

Profile Pic – Alter Ego art exhibition aims to create dialogue about who we are and who we have become. Profile pics have become a very interactive and highly creative platform to communicate visually. Profile pic Alter ego is a collaboration by artists from Harare and Bulawayo.

Exhibition Title: Profile Pic

Space: Anglo American Gallery

Preview: 1 December 2016

Put Down: 22 January 2017

Curator: Tafadzwa Gwetai

Guest Speaker: Rashid Jogee

For more information, please contact the Curatorial department on 00263970721 or email:sabona@mweb.co.zw. Follow us on Twitter @BYOgallery or Facebook https://www.facebook.com/nationalgallerybyo

PINK PERSPECTIVE EXHIBITION 2016

The National Gallery in Bulawayo is pleased to present the second edition of the Pink Perspectives exhibition; this year’s theme is REACH & IMPACT PINK. The exhibition is a collection of contemporary works by Bulawayo artist’s Thembelihle Adams, Linda Msebele, Sithabisiwe Khanye, Stanley Matengwa, Collings Chitaka, and images from Matabeleland Photographers Association and students from Townsend High School and Magwegwe as we join hands with the Zimbabwean community in celebrating the Breast Cancer awareness month. According to the National Cancer Prevention and Control Strategy 2013-17 of the Ministry of Health and Child Care, in Zimbabwe, cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality with over 5000 new diagnoses and over 1500 deaths per year. The number of people developing cancer is expected to increase due to HIV & AIDS, other infections and unhealthy lifestyle choices. One of the underlying challenges resulting in high cancer rates is the lack of knowledge by women and girls on early cancer screening and preventative measures.

5s4a2507IMG: Veronica Matebeleland Photographic Association

In the fight against cancer women and girls are generally victims and as care givers, very often have limited information about the disease. Therefore, the Pink Perspectives project will give participants the correct information, the ability to make proactive informed choices and decisions regarding their health. The exhibition seeks to encourage discourse on cancer within the creative sector which, to some extent eradicates the misconceptions attached to it. The National Gallery considers that in this way, Pink Perspectives will trigger awareness in each and every one of us. We are showing the visual perspective and engaging the society to zero in on breast and cervical cancer on how contemporary African society views breast cancer. As you go through the exhibition we hope oration on Breast and Cervical cancer will interchange
We believe that the first step to conquering stigma is to talk about it, openly and publicly and what better forum than the artistic one. As you appreciate this exhibition let us not lose sight of the seriousness of breast and cervical cancer and its adverse impact on the creative society and realize that change of societal perspective begins with the individual.

Curated by Silenkosi Moyo

with support from

 

lobels-logo

SALVAGE: solo exhibition of photographs by Nicola Ash.

Salvage-A5-Flier-2

 

“In photographing “place” we are never just photographing nature. We are always photographing culture.” – Gerry Badger

In 1975 a photographic exhibition entitled, ”The New Topographics” opened in New York and essentially re-wrote landscape photography. The show consisted of 168 rigorously formal, black and white prints of streets, warehouses, industrial sites and suburban houses. In many ways, it was an outright reaction to the idealized landscape photography dominated by the likes of Ansel Adams and Edward Weston. Fundamentally, however, its stark images set out to show the growing unease of how the natural landscape was being eroded by development and the spread of cities and industry.

Fast-forward 4 decades and throughout the world, cities, once the industrial capitals of their nations, are shrinking as Mother Nature returns. She climbs the curbs and cracks the tarmac; blows down walls and rusts the fence posts. The unease, this time around, is the reduction of man, of the man-made, and it is no more or no less disquieting.

In her first solo exhibition, Zimbabwean-based photographer Nicola Ash, gently confronts the viewer with this unnerving view, a journey through time in her current home-town, focusing almost entirely on Bulawayo’s rail industry, it’s legacy past and present. What led to such despoliation in the “City of Kings”? Is Bulawayo yet another post-industrial archetype consigned to the pages of history? Despite an overwhelming sense of resignation, hope appears to have miraculously survived, but it is no substitute for action.

The journey proffered is neither nostalgic nor sentimental, nor is it in any way judgemental. Photographs are complemented by extracts of poetry as well as items from the Bulawayo Railway Museum and the message reveals itself gradually Simple, often abstract images of yards and machinery are cut through with a number of large-scale portraits of local elderly residents. A reminder that this is essentially a journey of self, not merely place.

For more details please contact 00263970721 or email: sabona@mweb.co.zw

This July on 75 Josh

The second half exhibition schedule will start on 1 July 2016 by showcasing LUMINOUS an exhibition of Life Drawing Class drawings by Tamsanqa Khumalo, Bhekithse Ntshali, Hloniphani Dube, Dumisani Ndlovu, Cynthia Chamisa, Japhet Funwayo and Morgan Chandomba. The Private View and drinks reception will be start at 1730hrs to 2000hrs, in the Marshall Baron Gallery. The exhibition will be open to the public from 2 July to 22 August 2016.  Curated by Cliford Zulu.


Life Drawing class poster luminous 2016Network Connected is a two men exhibition by Resident Artist Talent Robert Kapadza and Harare based, visiting artist Terrence Musekiwa. The private view will be done on Thursday 7 July 2016 @ 1730hrs and the drinks reception will follow soon after remarks by Architect, Professor John Knight  in the Anglo American Gallery. Curated by Tafadzwa Gwetai. Meet the Artist and walk about will be held on Friday 8 July at 11am in the Anglo American Gallery.

network connected poster Gwetai

Rest Until and exhibition of photographs  will open in Bulawayo on Friday 29 July 2016.   Rest Until explores the land, the unborn, personal loss, memory, the spirit and the journey to renewal within the turbulent past and seemingly tumultuous future of Zimbabwe. Born in Bulawayo Starling maintains his full time darkroom and studio were he he works predominantly with traditional black and white photographic techniques his work is highly conceptual, personal and fueled by curiosity, mysterious and romantic, his photos explores themes of mortality and rebirth, memory along with its connection to photography, the history of a place and identity within post-colonial society.

neville starling ngb

 

———————————————————————————————————Khula Udweba Childrens programs at the Gallery. Kids Art lessons every Saturday drop the kids at 10am and pick them up at 1230pm participating fees USD $5 per session  the class will get certificate of participation in November 2016. other art lesson for preschool, junior and adult classes in drawing, painting, Music, print making and textiles all sessions are facilitated by practicing resident artists                                                                 ———————————————————————————————————-

For more details please contact c.zulu@nationalgallery.co.zw, sabona@mweb.co.zw to become a Friend of the Gallery in Bulawayo come through or send us an email we will send you a subscription form and enjoy events and exhibition updates at Douslin House. Better still subscribe on this page www.nationalgallerybyo.com, follow us on www.facebook.com/nationalgallerybyo or join the conversions on Twitter @byogallery Tel: 00263970721

We would love to here from you. Cliford Zulu.

 

This June on 75 Josh.

CURRENTLY SHOWING:  In My Private Moments: Small Galleries on L. Takawira Curated by Mthabisi Phili

Invite

A critique by Voti Thebe

A critical look at the In My Private Moments Exhibition by two female artists Fulufhelo Mobadi and Kresiah Mukwazhi now showing at the National Gallery in Bulawayo, running from the 3 to 31 June 2016.

Kresiah grew up in Harare trained in photography at the Market Photo Workshop in Johannesburg.  Fulufhelo trained in the same institute as Kresiah and is exhibiting for the first time outside her native country South Africa.  Both artists are young, full of zeal and wide expectations, showing vigor to explore this artistic terrain that is starved of female artists.

The use of the camera as tool has crept into the fine arts.  Gone are the days when the painter, painstakingly painted a portrait from a live model.  It’s now easier to freeze that moment and paint from the photograph.  The camera has the same concept as the eye.  The eye can not lie even the camera cannot lie, though it lies when manipulated in the studio or under the wrong settings. Whereas the God-given eye does not lie, it tells the truth, only the truth so help us God.

The art works on display explores the anatomy – the human body that has been part of the fire in the visual arts; that fire is redefined by each artist.  These young artistic photographers are lighting dark terrain with their cutting edge images that explore the private moments of women in general within our communities.  It has a sense of wit ejaculating with probing instinct of the young and fresh with the zeal of exploring new grounds.  Most of the images on show are black and white photos – bring that essence of the yester year before colour photography was invented.

The bird’s eye view of the whole exhibition is the sensitive use of the skin and the second skin – apparel. Especially the second skin that touches the body.  It questions its authenticity, its sensuality.  It explore the essence of who we are before the fall of mankind.

The use of undies as still life for yet another photograph to be taken is remarkable.  It captures your attention to detail or have we run out of still life objects or it’s a way of bringing out that femininity that we all long for, that femininity we have embraced from childhood? The innocence of a child when looking at the undies on the washing line, on the dura wall, on top of a shrub or hedge, or laying on the rock.  It brings out the unadulterated mind.

Both artists Fulufhelo and Kresiah have used their own bodies as models in some of the images.  Whereby sacrificing themselves on the cross of creativity.

The use of the African mask in Fulufhelo’s photos adds spiritual dimension to the show.  She takes the mask to another dimension of creativity.  The mask on the female body looks absurd to the male chauvinist and yet it is there to make a statement on what man has done to mother earth. On one of the photos titled “Zinhle”, she has used the mask the Tasmanians’ way of Taiwan who wear the mask on the back of their heads so as to distract the tiger from attacking them from behind.  Same principle might apply on this image to the rapist that is lacking in the concrete jungles of this world.  Within the African tradition context the mask is only worn by male mask dancers. Like all religion, be it Christianity or other is male dominated therefore the mask on her body is a statement.

Voti Thebe  Regional Director   National Gallery in Bulawayo  June 2016

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2nd edition: Zimbabwe Independence Annual Exhibition 2016: Memorialisation

Small Galleries on Main

Curated By Cliford Zulu

 In celebrating of Zimbabwe’s independence in 2016, the National Gallery in Bulawayo is pleased to present the second Zimbabwe Independence Annual exhibition titled Memorialisation by local Zimbabwean artists, as a way of engaging the participation by artists throughout the country on National Issues. The exhibition also seeks to captivate the nation to revive the spirit of Ubuntu/uhnu that has dwindled over the past 10years by celebrating our cultural diversity and shared history, further enriching the nation’s cultural heritage and tangible visual culture. The exhibition is making statements concerning our social developments, environmental surroundings and cultural inheritance, but above all it asks you the observer” What does memorialisation in the context of Zimbabwe’s independence mean to you”?  In this setting the definition of the word Memorialisation, implies a tradition, inheritance, legacy, culture and customs or one’s visual perspective of Zimbabwe’s independence. The exhibition aims to be seen as a contemporary guide for creative memory of our Independence celebrations in April/ May and driving to preserve cultural archives of the country’s inventive activities in the post-independence Zimbabwe, over the passage of time.

The exhibition features the work by Farai Mushandinga, Talent Kapadza, Nompilo Nkomo, Dumisani Ndlovu, Khumbulani Mpofu, Mercy Nhauranwa, Neville Starling, Jeanette Johnson, Joan Rarlow, Proud Moyo, Nkosiyazi Siziba and Lotus Makopa.

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pachipamwe ,RETROSPECTIVE Exhibition 2016

Throughout the African continent, workshops are contributing to the generation of contemporary forms of the visual arts.’ This is particularly true in Zimbabwe, where collaborations and workshops continue to provide influential support for many artists. Understanding contemporary art provides an excellent foundation for the introduction of an alternative model: the Pachipamwe International Art Workshop. Pachipamwe (in Shona, “We come together again”) was initiated by artist Pat Pearce after realising the unevenness of art in Zimbabwe after Independence. She worked with the founders of the Triangle International Workshops, Anthony Caro and Robert Loder and collaborated with a committee of Zimbabweans, including writer Diana Mitchell and sculptor Tapfuma Gutsa, to start the project.

The first Pachipamwe workshop was held at Murewa Culture House in 1988. The second Pachipamwe, was held at the historic Cyrene Mission, just outside of Bulawayo, the following year and provided an inspiring setting for the workshop. Cyrene mission is a vanguard of modern art training in Zimbabwe located in the outskirts of Bulawayo in the Matobo District, also the home of the Matopo National Park with massive granite ranges, many with wonderful prehistoric Bushmen paintings. The artistic legacy of Cyrene Secondary School is historically significant. It was here in 1939 that missionary Canon Paterson first introduced formal art education in painting and sculpture (including stone) to young people in the region. His aim was to encourage a local visual interpretation of the Christian narrative.

Contemporary art in this country has come a long way from Rhodesia to Zimbabwe changing with times and space, form and denotation, one thing remains common it is still functional and aesthetically appealing to the people of Zimbabwe and the visitor.

FOR MORE DETAILS follow and interect with us on Titter our hangle is @BYOgallery  https://www.facebook.com/nationalgallerybyo/?fref=ts  or https://www.facebook.com/nationalgallery.bulawayo?fref=ts

Contact Tel: 00263970721, email: sabona@mweb.co.zw, Cliford Zulu

Second edition: Zimbabwe Annual Independence Exhibition 2016.

douslin house

In celebrating of Zimbabwe’s independence in 2016, the National Gallery in Bulawayo is pleased to present the second Zimbabwe Independence Annual exhibition titled Memorialisation by local Zimbabwean artists, as a way of engaging the participation by artists throughout the country on National Issues. The exhibition also seeks to captivate the nation to revive the spirit of Ubuntu/uhnu that has dwindled over the past 10years by celebrating our cultural diversity and shared history, further enriching the nation’s cultural heritage and tangible visual culture. The exhibition is making statements concerning our social developments, environmental surroundings and cultural inheritance, but above all it asks you the observer” What does memorialisation in the context of Zimbabwe’s independence mean to you”?  In this setting the definition of the word Memorialisation, implies a tradition, inheritance, legacy, culture and customs or one’s visual perspective of Zimbabwe’s independence. The exhibition aims to be seen as a contemporary guide for creative memory of our Independence celebrations in April/ May and driving to preserve cultural archives of the country’s inventive activities in the post-independence Zimbabwe, over the passage of time.

The exhibition features the work by Farai Mushandinga, Talent Kapadza, Nompilo Nkomo, Dumisani Ndlovu, Khumbulani Mpofu, Mercy Nhauranwa, Neville Starling, Jeanette Johnson, Joan Rarlow, Proud Moyo, Nkosiyazi Siziba and Lotus Makopa.

The exhibition runs until the end of May 2016

Enjoy the Show. We would like to hear from you. Contact the Curator Cliford Zulu

E-mail: sabona@mweb.co.zw or call 00263970721. www.nationalgallerybyo.com

Open call: 2nd Zimbabwe Annual Independence Exhibition 2016: Memorialisation

Submission dates, 19 to 22 April 2016
National Gallery of Zimbabwe in Bulawayo www.nationalgallerybyo.com

In celebrating of Zimbabwe’s independence in 2016, the National Gallery is inviting submissions to the second Zimbabwe Independence Annual exhibition and full participation by artists throughout the country at the same time engaging the nation to revive the spirit of Ubuntu/uhnu, by celebrating our cultural diversity and shared history, further enriching the nation’s cultural heritage and tangible visual culture. The exhibition is expected to make statements concerning our social developments, environmental surroundings and cultural inheritance.” What does memorialisation mean to you? The definition of the word memorialisation, implies a tradition, inheritance, legacy, culture and customs or one’s visual perspective of Zimbabwe’s independence. The exhibition will aim to be seen as a contemporary guide for creative memory of our Independence Day celebrations derivation and growth driving to preserve cultural archives of the country’s inventive activities in the post-independence Zimbabwe, over the passage of time.
With this in mind;
Submissions
Submissions to the 2nd Zimbabwe Independence Annual Exhibition 2016, Exhibition 2016 can be made by any artist Zimbabwean aged over 18 years. Submitted artworks may fall into a wide range of genres associated with art and design these include painting, drawing, sculpture, installation, photography, video, performance, design, craft, sound and any new media. Submissions must reach the National Gallery in Bulawayo between 19 and 22 April 2016.

Exhibition
The exhibition will be held at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe in Bulawayo, one of the largest and most beautiful spaces for contemporary art in the country opening on 28 April at 1730hrs and run until 24 May, 2016.

Further information
for additional information, please contact: Cliford Zulu, Exhibition Curator,
NGB 75 Joshua N M Nkomo Street Bulawayo, T +263 9 70721 / cliffzuluus@gmail.com,sabona@mweb.co.zw